How Google Tracks Your Personal Information

 

Part 1:

How Google Tracks Your Personal Information

When lazy journalists are pessimistic about Amazon’s Alexa or Google Home, they say stuff like: “Even Orwell couldn’t have predicted that we’d willingly bring Big Brother into our own homes.”

What they fail to mention is our willingness to exchange privacy for convenience didn’t start with the advent of virtual assistants. It started in the early 2000s, when people—in return for having access to Google products and seeing more relevant ads—allowed Google to have all their data.

Today, Google provides marketers like me with so much of your personal data that we can infer more about you from it than from any camera or microphone.

There have never been more opportunities for marketers like me to exploit your data. Today, 40,000 Google search queries are conducted every second. That’s 3.5 billion searches per day,…

In case you were starting to feel a semblance of happiness, what with the holidays around the corner, here is a complete checklist of everything Google knows about you—thereby all the ways you’re tracked—as of December 2018:

  • Your age
  • Your income
  • Your gender
  • Your parental status
  • Your relationship status
  • Your browsing history (long-term and short-term)
  • Your device (phone, tablet, desktop, TV)
  • Your physical location
  • The age of your child (toddler, infant, etc.)
  • How well you did in high school
  • The degree you hold
  • The time (of day) of your Google usage
  • The language you speak
  • Whether you’ve just had a major life event
  • Your home ownership status
  • Your mobile carrier
  • The exact words you enter into Google search
  • The context and topics of the websites you visit
  • The products you buy
  • The products you have almost bought
  • Your Wi-Fi type
  • Your proximity to a cell tower
  • Your app installation history
  • The amount of time you spend on certain apps
  • Your operating system
  • The contents of your email
  • The time you spend on certain websites
  • Whether you’re moving (e.g., into a new home)
  • Whether you’re moving (e.g., walking or on a train)

* The above targeting methods are made available to search engine marketers by Google within marketers’ Ads UI. Info is also freely available here.

For as long as you’ve been using Google, Google has been building a “citizen profile” on you. This profile contains:

 

Full article – medium.com

 

Part 2:

How Google Marketers Exploit Your Discomfort

Today, three out of four smartphone owners turn to Google first to address their immediate needs. As a result, Google marketers like me must survive on our ability to play on your impatience and impulsiveness when you’re using a mobile device. We must be there to serve you an ad in your “micro-moment,” the second you decide to use your phone to alleviate the discomfort of not having “it” now — whether “it” is a last-minute sale, directions to a soon-closing store, information about a fast-filling class, or anything else.

As Google plainly phrases it, micro-moments are the “intent-rich moments when decisions are made, and preferences shaped.” This belies what Google can’t say: Your need-it-now mentality usually comes with uncomfortable feelings of anxiety and fear. When you’re shopping in this mindset (for anything, not just a product), your restraint is clouded by emotion. Your immediate transactional, navigational, or informational “need” is conflated with a desire for your bad feelings to go away.

 

Full article – medium.com

 

Part 3:

How Marketers Use Redirect Ads to Deceive You

Redirection” is a catchall term for a form of bait-and-switch deception used by Google marketers. A helpful ad on Google will match a searcher’s keywords with a relevant landing page, but redirect ads provide counter-messaging and often alternative destinations that go against the search words.

For example, if you search Google for “iPhone 6S,” you’re predictably going to be shown an ad for the iPhone 6S. By clicking that ad, you’ll probably land on a page where you can buy one. A redirect ad, however, might twist your search and prompt you with something like this for a Galaxy S6 instead:

 

Full article – medium.com

 

I got the info from – NOGAPPS (Telegram – Group)